International District

International District


The International District is Seattle’s version of Chinatown. Like most Chinatown’s around the country, this nabe is filled to the breaking point with incredible cheap restaurants and weird shopping options. International District is a major tourist destination in Seattle, but it brings in the locals as well. Excellent mass transit access round out this already awesome and unique nabe.

International District, Seattle Data : Neighborhoods & Travel – Score out of 100


Dining 94
Public Transportation 85
Ethnic 75
Empty nesters 64
Artists/Creatives 63


Families 41
Clean 40
Quiet 35
Pet friendly 33
Income 3

International District, Seattle Reviews

A Community on the verge of impacting the world

In the ever changing Community, I grew up as a kid with my family. I have noticed the changes as it grew to what is now. Known as the International District, there are many opportunities to learn and share. I remember a lot of stories, and lived alot of history here. It has been home for me as a kid, and now is a home for my growing family too.

Shopping is abundant here, as well as the cultural and historical value. I am always noticing the strong ties with the family’s and how the whole district intertwines while doing day to day business.

I now serve the community I live at in various ways. I am deeply rooted in this community that has been home for many throughout the decades. The closeness of the business’ relationships with their customers are amazing, as things evolve in today’s diverse society.

This is an inviting community with open arms to find new friends, and learn new ideas, as it keeps it’s distinct cultural values and roots. Always on a never ending search to grow in new directions to join it’s fellow neighborhoods.

Come see for yourself all that this fabulous district has to offer.

Kay C.



The International District, just south of downtown and east of the ballparks, is an interesting little nook in the Seattle conglomerate of weird neighborhoods. While titled the “International” District, a better title would likely be “Little Asia” as there is little in the lines of cultural enclaves in the neighborhood that are not of asian descent. Dirty and bustling, and filled to the brim with ethnic asian cuisine being cooked up homestyle by the people who have been doing it for generations, the International District is the place to get the best noodles or Pho in town, and to go shopping for those weird ingredients your local hippie-infused co-op doesn’t carry.

An interesting stop on the tourist train for Seattle, most of the people you encounter in this neighborhood are either asian locals who live and work in the district, hipsters looking for good cheap meals, or tourists ogling the signs they can’t read and wondering what the hell that weird smelling item in the corner market is.

Close to Pioneer Square and Union Station, the International District is easy to get to and to get out of, it is safe and friendly, and smells completely different than the rest of the city. It’s a small neighborhood, so only an hour or two are needed to take it in, but it’s worth the small amount of effort required to get to it.

Zachary Walker



This is what I have to say about the International District: loud, noisy, somewhat on the grungy side, and parking is a bear. But that’s the minus side. If you can tolerate the down side then the ID’s plus side will blow your taste buds away. The ID has the corner on some praiseworthy Asian restaurants and it’s the best place to find yourself hungry. Popular eateries such as Mike’s Noodle House, Jade Garden, and Green Leaf should forget about closing time and ought to remain open 24/7. No matter what Asian cuisine you’re hankering for, the ID will have the restaurant for you.

What’s awesome

Amazing collection of Asian restaurants all in one spot

What’s not so awesome

It’s neither clean nor dirty. It could be cleaner.




It is often wondered why the International District isn’t just called Chinatown but one only needs to get hungry and wander through this nabe to find out that more than one Asain country is represented in this little nabe squeezed between SoDo and The Central District.

The best part is that all the food has been squeezed in there too in the form of authentic restaurants galore. You can also explore the stores and absorb a great deal of culture and basically have a passport to Asia for the day. If you like it enough to settle down the price is certainly right as these are some of the most affordable apartments in the city.

What’s awesome

All the restaurants ant eateries.

What’s not so awesome

Narrowing it down to just one.

Bowen S.



I think if I moved to Seattle I would want to move here. It’s convenient to the downtown Seattle area via the light rail system and coming from San Francisco the rent seems relatively cheap; I saw a sign for a Studio for $600 a month. Almost any studio (even an efficiency studio!) would cost you close to $1000 a month in San Francisco.

Food in this neighborhood is awesome and choices plentiful. While there we stopped off at a delicious Cambodian noodles place and picked up some fresh groceries at the expansive and relatively inexpensive Uwajimaya market and consumed some of our tasty treats in the adjoining food court. Other cuisines available in this neighborhood include Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese, and Thai. The cheap and ubiquitous Bánh Mì sandwiches are especially attractive to stinting travelers.

If you seek edification and a thorough overview of the history of the Asian Pacific American experience, look no further than the well-designed and informative Wing Luke Museum. For picture-takers and a chance to repose, stop off in Hing Hay Park and admire the pagoda and people watching.

Zane M.



International District is full of culture and great place to get your grub on. Some of my favorite Chinese food, Hot Pot and Bubble tea are available in the International District. It is also the home to several Newspapers like the NW Asian Weekly, Người Việt Tây Bắc/Northwest Vietnamese News, and the International Examiner. It is a fun place to visit and go to dinner or have lunch down in the area. If you like this type of area you can find a nice condo in the area and be close to the downtown Seattle vibe.

Thach Nguyen



I used to live on Jefferson, a quick bike ride away and would hop on down here just out of pure curiosity. It soon developed into a weekly habit. You can spend about $30 on groceries and be set for a week, and grab a $2 Bánh mi sandwich while you’re at it. I’m still not really sure the half of what goes on down here after 3 years, but for those brave few I can imagine regular visits to be a rewarding endeavor and refreshing change of culture.


Tags: Seattle